Two questions you need to know to get unstuck.

Have you ever been in such a deep funk that you just can't seem to get out of?  A couple weeks ago I found myself in a downward spiral of negativity. I felt empty and then also a little frustrated that I was feeling that way.  A lot of terrible things had been happening in the world and it was really making me depressed--like hopeless and depressed. I literally cannot afford to be uninspired as being creative is a major part of my job description. Several days of this went by and I realized that even though I kept trying to get to the "root" of the problem I was only going deeper and deeper into this sad and frustrated state.  I kept asking myself things like, "Abby, what is making you feel like way?"  and, "Abby, why are you sad?" I thought these questions I was asking myself were going to help me pinpoint where this feeling was coming from but instead I just kept thinking of more reasons I could be sad. It was the most intense apathy I had experienced in a long time. I was starting to get desperate for a fresh breath of positivity but I just felt like I kept hitting a brick wall.  I finally decided that enough was enough and maybe I was trying to hit this thing from the wrong angle.  Einstein says the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. The feeling of insanity was beginning to get overwhelming so, I went back to the drawing board and started asking some better questions. My first question to myself was,

"Abby, do these sad feelings belong to you?"

The answer to that question is an absolute, undeniable and resounding NO! They are not mine.  So then the next question came naturally,

"If those feelings don't belong to me, what feelings do belong to me?

Just thinking about the feelings that do belong to me instantly felt lighter: happiness, joy, love, peace, restfulness, lightness, freedom, inspiration, etc. It was then that I finally was able to disconnect myself from the frustration and step into a better mental place. Shortly after this breakthrough it's like my inspiration highway was open again--thank goodness! There is just nothing worse than being trapped inside your own mind.  

Have you ever been stuck? What has helped you get out of your emotional funk?

Thanks for stopping by, yall.  Until next time!

With all my love and positive vibes,

Abby

What I like to wear on-site: casual edition.

Over the years I've unintentionally created my own uniform for when I'm on the job.  It's pretty fun being able to actually design a look that sort of becomes your identity. 

 

These Paige jeans are my life. They are super stretchy and distressed in all the right places.  I have big thighs and a full booty so stretch jeans are the closest I can get to being in leggings all day and they offer a little more coverage.   

Maybe it's my age or size but as sexy as heels are to walk around town in, I just can't do it.  I still love them though so these Jeffery Campbell booties (mine are sold-out but these are just as good) are my go-to. Comfy yet sexy with a touch of 'don't mess with me' gangsta. 

The tank I'm wearing in this pic is from Vince and I can't find it (possibly because I've had it for like five years) but this one by T by Alexander Wang is amazing. It's a men's shirt but check the sizing chart and order according to your measurements. I think I might need like a dozen.  

I wear this necklace every single day of my life. It goes with everything and helps break up a boxy shirt. It could be feminine or masculine and just love it so much.  

Do you have a uniform that you've designed for yourself? Comment below and leave a pic!

With all my love and stretchy denim,

Abby

On going into people's homes.

When you work on-location you are usually going into people's homes. This is an incredibly important thing and how you handle yourself can make or break your reputation as a professional stylist. Home is where real life happens. You are bound to see arguments, messes, and your clients in their most comfortable environment.  There is a tangible feeling of vulnerability on your client's part and it is our responsibility to steward that vulnerability with the utmost care.  Here are a few tips to do just that:

  1. Be punctual. Try to arrive to your appointments a few minutes before you're due so you are ready to go the minute they sit in your chair. Running behind happens, and when it does it is important to communicate with the clients it will effect. If you think you may be late shoot a text (or a quick call) to your nexty. Respecting your client's time will mean a lot to them and even if your punctuality isn't perfect it will still help them develop a trust in you.   
  2. Have all your tools with you.  I am constantly moving my stuff around and there have been times when I have left things behind that I need.  While you can usually work around the problem without too many issues you will sweat less and give your client's a more quality service if you have all your tools. If you find yourself leaving things behind come up with a system to keep that from happening like a checklist or bag organization where you can visibly see that your missing an item. With a touch of extra planning you can save yourself mucho sweat beads.  
  3. Don't overstay your welcome. Some of my most beloved friends started out as clients first. We are 'daymakers' and we automatically feel close to the people we see often and make smile. However, not everyone of your clients is your bff and it's soooo important not to get too comfortable in their homes. I always try to err on the side of being "mostly hairdresser" than "mostly friend" even though we are both to them.  Unless they are begging you to stay, when you are finished with your work there, pack up, clean up, and be on your merry way. 
  4. Don't under-stay your welcome. This is where your intuition needs to kick in. Building a good rapport with your clients sometimes goes beyond just doing your job and heading out.  If they ask you to stay or invite you to something fun, by all means GO, but always keep in mind you are still representing your business and your brand so be professional!
  5. Leave them better than you found them. As a mom, this is something that makes the most incredible impression on me. When my daughter cleans up after herself I feel so grateful and it makes me want to keep her around a little longer. On a professional level, your clients should never have to deal with the mess you leave behind.  Always ask for a broom/vacuum to clean up hair.  Have a cloth or wipes to clean any leftover residue or spills on the surfaces you've been working on.  Place hot tools on a heat resistant pad. Doing these simple things will leave an huge impact on your clients and can help guarantee they'll be happy to invite you back again.  
  6. Be trustworthy. We hold more than hairdryers and flat irons as hairdressers, we hold our client's hearts. You may be the only person they share some of their most personal information with some days. It is our job to keep our hearts open and our mouths shut.                                                         

What are some valuable lessons you've learned as an on-location hairdresser? 

Leave me a comment below!

With all my heart and hairspray,

Abby